Evidence-based Projects

 

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Evidence-based Projects

Extended Evaluation Project.   Music Therapy in an NHS Mental Health Setting.

This project was project was carried out in conjunction with the charity, Key Changes Music Therapy.  It gathered quantitative and qualitative evidence, (numerical data and personal observations) about the positive effects of medium-term music therapy in service users’ lives on two wards – rehabilitation and medium secure.   Patients were offered 20 weekly group music therapy sessions.  Quantitative data was collected at the beginning and end in pre and post-therapy mood scores, as well as pre-and post sessions scores for each session.   Qualitative data was also collected in the form of patients’ experiences and insights into how music therapy had contributed to their recovery.  To read a summary report click here.  

 

Short Pilot Project within an NHS Mental Health Setting.  

This project was carried out in conjunction with the charity, Key Changes Music Therapy.   It gathered quantitative and qualitative evidence, (numerical data and personal observations) about the positive effects of short-term music therapy for service users in two wards – acute and intensive care.   To read about this click here.  

 

Project in a Cancer Care Setting.

This project was carried out in conjunction with Richmond Music Therapy Service.   It evaluated the effects of medium-term receptive-based music therapy for patients and their carers in a cancer care setting.   Two groups of between 10 and 20 patients and their carers were invited to relax while specific therapeutic sounds were played and sung.   Afterwards, they were invited to score their moods and describe their experiences.    To read the summary report, click here.  

 

Evaluation Project of Music Therapy in a Special School.  

The aim of this project was to evaluate my own work with children in a local generic special needs school.    Teachers were asked to feedback their perceptions about the benefits of music therapy for their pupils, both through observations and numerical scores.  Of particular importance was how they felt these benefits had translated into pupil behaviour or attainment outside of the therapy room and in the classroom.  

See results for 2012 and results for 2013.

All names and settings have been changed